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Founders and Survivors newsletter


Founders and Survivors Newsletter, No.14, September 2013

This is the second edition of Chainletter for 2013. It provides a progress report on the Ships Project and the future of Founders & Survivors. Also, volunteer Colin Tuckerman writes about the Earl St Vincent; a new book, Patchwork Prisoners is reviewed; Rebecca Kippen gives a history of birth, death and marriage registrations in Tasmania; Garry McLoughlin tells the remarkable story of Irish convict Philip O'Reilly; and Jenny Wells details an example of chain migration to Tasmania.

Founders and Survivors Newsletter, No.13, May 2013

This is the first edition of Chainletter for 2013. It's theme is 'imposture and the fantasists who committed it'. Read fascinating stories of rogues, murderers and swindlers. Also find out what the volunteers have been doing this year, and the future of the Founders and Survivors project.

A small (1.3 MB) and large (3.1 MB) version of the newsletter is available for download. Enjoy!

Founders and Survivors Newsletter No.12, December 2012

This third edition of Chainletter for 2012 features articles about Founders & Survivors Storylines; the common hangman, William Bamford; chain migration; the men of the Indefatigable; and a convict tour of Ireland in photos. There are also updates on Founders and Survivors projects, book reviews and volunteer news.

Enjoy reading this over the Christmas holidays. We wish you a Happy New Year!

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Founders and Survivors Newsletter No.11, August 2012

This second issue of Chainletter for 2012 farewells Claudine Chionh and welcomes Trudy Cowley and Colette McAlpine. For ships project volunteers, the focus turns to quality control and the next Victorian workshop is announced.

The first featured article in this issue is an article by Megan Webber titled "Reformation and Recidivism: The London Refuge for the Destitute, c.1806–1849". This provides a wonderful insight into the operation of such refuges and discusses how to determine if your convict was in such a refuge.

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